The Man from Yesterday – March 2018

LETHBRIDGE-STEWART COMES FULL CIRCLE

After fourteen novels, Candy Jar Books announces the conclusion to their Lethbridge-Stewart ongoing storyline that began with The Forgotten Son.

Written by popular novelist, Nick Walters, The Man from Yesterday sees the return of Lethbridge-Stewart’s missing father, Wing Commander Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart.

Head of Publishing, Shaun Russell, says: “We decided some time ago to wrap up the novels as a continuing storyline, although it’s not the end of the Lethbridge-Stewart range. They will merely continue in a different vein. We have one more standalone novel The New Unusual set just before The Man from Yesterday coming in late spring, and then in the summer we begin to release our special anniversary series of books (six new novels that dip into various points within Lethbridge-Stewart’s timeline).”

Range Editor Andy Frankham-Allen says: “It’s been great fun developing and guiding the ongoing story, with plots and themes continuing from The Forgotten Son through to The Man from Yesterday, but Shaun and I decided it’s time for something a little different. The Man from Yesterday is the perfect finale, taking the series full circle, wrapping up themes set up with that first novel, and bringing the whole thing into sharp focus with Lethbridge-Stewart’s family at the centre. Just as it began! And who better than Nick Walters, who was there at the beginning of the series, to wrap it all up for us? What’s also great about Nick’s return, is that he is the only author to pen a second novel in the series (other than me). Up to now each book has been written by a different author, which is, I feel, something we can all be proud of.”

Author Nick Walters says: “After Mutually Assured Domination, which was a knockabout, fun romp, it was great to write something with more depth. We’d been kicking about the idea of the Brigadier’s father returning for some time, but hadn’t found a suitable plot. The Man From Yesterday started life in early 2016 as something quite different, a tale of alien map-makers called The Cartographers of Oberos (after a potential sequel to The Turing Test, also bringing Gordon back, just didn’t click for us). This initial version had too much focus on the aliens, and once this was scaled back, the story really began to take shape. Especially when the title came to me out of the blue one afternoon. The idea of setting it (mostly) within the county of Norfolk was quite deliberate – firstly, there is, obviously, the Cromer connection, and, secondly, I thought it rather fun to have a story set in one small geographic location, for a change. It doesn’t mean the story is small – not by any means – it’s big in terms of themes and ideas, and of course that alien element still remains.”

Wing Commander Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart was created by Andy Frankham-Allen for The Forgotten Son in 2014, and has appeared in a couple of short stories since, but this is his first full-novel role. Talking about developing him further, Nick says: “I was given free rein with Gordon and decided to imbue him with the core Lethbridge-Stewart values of integrity, bravery, duty, responsibility etc, but also introduce a slightly odd side to him (because of what’s happened to him). In appearance I struggled to visualise him until I put him in a suit and hey presto, Sean Connery in The Rock! I also gave him some action scenes to demonstrate that he’s still a badass despite his advanced years. He’s a man out of time, and there’s an element of that about him too, especially in one scene where he wanders the streets of Norwich. And despite the emotional heft of the story, I found him a fun character to write, and some of his scenes with his son are hilarious.”

The book features a forward by Paul Leonard, author of the ever-popular Doctor Who novel, The Turing Test, among many others. Of Nick he says: “He’s achieved a writing career through sheer determination and hard work, keeping going through a third of a lifetime, learning as he went, earning very little, working till the small hours to get the stories finished on time. Perhaps as a result of his other [writing] work, he brings a clarity of style and depth of characterisation still too rare in genre fiction to his Who-related material, taking even occasional followers like myself into the world of the Doctor and making it a reality.”

The cover is provided by Paul Cooke, who previously provided the artwork for the free short story, Eve of the Fomorians. Paul says: “I’ve been a fan of the Lethbridge-Stewart books from the start. In fact I loved the first one that much I drew a fan art cover in the style of the old Target books, and cheekily asked Andy if there was any chance of doing one. Flash forward to September 2016, I had the opportunity to do a cover illo for a free digital story they sent out to subscribers. I had hoped to be able to contribute another, but when you have artists of the calibre of Adrian Salmon, Richard Young and Colin Howard working on them, I’d sort of given up hope. Then one day out of the blue, only weeks ago really, Andy asked me if I fancied doing one!”

Talking about composing the image, and the inspiration, Paul says: “It was to be an image based on, and mirroring, the layout of the first book. One of the nice things I had to do was come up with a portrait of the Brig’s dad, and a new race of aliens (who doesn’t want to draw aliens?). Once Andy told me what he wanted from the cover, I set about doing some design sketches of the dad and the alien for both Andy and Nick Walters to approve – it’s easier to get it wrong and change it at this stage than spending hours painting and then have to change it! Once the sketches had been approved, I then went to sketches of the cover, to get the placings correct. At this stage, I realised one of the suggestions to the cover didn’t work within the layout (Cromer), so Andy suggested a replacement (the Hawker Typhoon plane) which was perfect. A few little revisions, and it was on to the painting. I work mostly digitally now, in a program called Manga Studio, so it was onto the computer and putting the time in to do the best job I could.”

Blurb:

Gordon’s alive?

The English Channel, May 1945. Leading his squadron of Hawker Typhoons back to base from a  traumatic mission in the Baltic, Wing Commander Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart goes missing – one of the unsolved mysteries of the Second World War.

Cromer, 1970. Doctor Anne Travers and Lieutenant Bill Bishop are investigating a mysterious phenomenon after hearing reports of ‘pink lightning’ seen over the Norfolk coast, while strange elfin creatures are glimpsed by the locals. And in the Red Fort, his new base of operations deep below Norwich, General James Gore is making his plans.

Brigadier Alistair Lethbridge-Stewart receives a phone call that will change his life. Could it be, after all this time, that his father has come back from yesterday?

This edition of The Man from Yesterday is limited to 400 copies and is due out early March. All pre-orders of series five will receive a free digital short story called The Comrades by Brian Gallagher by the summer.

The final release for series five (although the second novel in the series) is estimated to be out at the end of April 2018.

The Man from Yesterday is available for pre-order now, for £8.99 (+ p&p). You can pre-order it individually or as part of the discounted UK bundle for only £26.25 (including postage), saving £9.72, or an international bundle for only £45.00 (including postage), saving £5.97. Or, you can buy it as part of our yearly subscription offer. Order early to avoid disappointment.

 

http://www.candy-jar.co.uk/books/themanfromyesterday.html

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Author: Andy Frankham-Allen

Stephen King, in the introduction to the 2005 re-issue of ‘Salem’s Lot wrote, ‘Writing controlled fiction is called “plotting”. Buckling your seatbelt and letting the story take over, however… that is called “storytelling”. Storytelling is as natural as breathing; plotting is the literary version of artificial respiration’, and that pretty much sums up Andy’s own brand of writing. His stories have plots, but they are plots that evolve from the characters, plots that develop as the characters do once a key idea is conceived. He has written several novels in the Space: 1889 & Beyond series, and short stories for Big Finish’s official Doctor Who anthologies, as well as many short stories published by Untreed Reads and was editor of Pantechnicon eZine which he co-founded with Trudi Topham in 2007. In 2013 he wrote the ultimate guide to the Companions of Doctor Who for Candy Jar Books, which won rave reviews from Doctor Who Magazine (“Frankham-Allen’s style is engaging and enthusiastic, maintaining a pacey discourse throughout when it would have been easy to just provide a droning list… As the role of the companion continues to grow and develop within Doctor Who, on screen and off, there’s a sense that this is just the beginning of a work that is ripe for updating in a few year’s time. Let’s hope that Andy Frankham-allen is already working on volume two.”) and other science fiction magazines. His magnum opus, The Garden, remains incomplete with only the first of four books released. However, until vampires become in vogue again and a mainstream publisher wishes to pick it up, he feels that Seeker will remain an orphan. His favourite contemporary authors are John Connolly, Karin Slaughter and John Ajvide Lindqvist, and his favourite genre authors are HG Wells, John Wyndham and Stephen King. His favourite television shows are Supernatural and Doctor Who (1963-1989) with various other shows vying for third place, including The 4400, Battlestar Galactica (remake), Dollhouse, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and countless others. His musical tastes vary a lot, and he enjoys everything from metal to classical. He’s a bit of a comic fan, or was when younger, and loves almost every single Marvel film made, and a few DC (but can’t stand the work of Christopher Nolan). But most of all he loves with a passion The Transformers (although he always stresses at this point that he’s referring to the original comics that began in 1984 and not the modern iterations thereof). When asked why he became a writer, he explains, ‘I was always going to become one of three things. Either a singer, a dancer or a writer. I can only sing well when in the shower, or drunk, a serious ankle injury in 1996 put paid to any serious dreams of dancing (although I can still move on a dance floor, don’t you worry), and so I was left with writing.’

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